Should You Add An Air Purifier To Your Home Gym

Indoor air pollution has been found in some studies to be as much as 100 times worse than the air outside. Tobacco smoke, household cleaning products, chemical air fresheners, mold, radon, formaldehyde, building material byproducts, carbon and nitrogen dioxide – there’s a lot of dangerous stuff lingering in the air inside our homes. 

A great many of you out there may find the idea of working out in a dingy, dusty home gym appealing. If you’re at all concerned about breathing clean air while working out to improve your health, you probably don’t.

High Cost

A whole-house air purification system is something that everyone should have installed in their homes and maintained regularly. Of course, not everyone wants to spend upwards of $5000 on what most people would consider a “luxury” expense. This, despite how dangerous the air inside the average home is.

If you don’t have a whole-house system, a portable air purifier is the next best thing.

How to Choose an  Air Purifier

There are thousands of different models to choose from, offered by hundreds of different manufacturers. It would be easy enough to just do a Google search, see what models have the highest ratings, then purchase whatever fits into your price range. That’s the easiest way, but not the smartest.

The most expensive model won’t be the best option. Nor will the cheapest one on the shelf. Continue reading below to learn the most important things to look for when choosing an air purifier for your home needs.

Look for HEPA filters

Choosing an purifier that offers this will ensure the air you’re breathing while you workout or relax is as clean as it can be:

  • HEPA filter: High-Efficiency Particulate Air filters are designed to filter 99.97% of all airborne particulates down to 0.03 microns. This is about as good as it gets for particulate filtration – outside perhaps what’s used in high-tech laboratory environments. This option won’t cost much more than a non-HEPA filter.

Size does matter:

All jokes aside, you can consider any money you spend on an air purifier completely wasted if you don’t get a unit that’s made to more than adequately filter the space you’ll be using it in. Choosing an air filter based on the square footage it can filter is the same as buying an air conditioner to cool a room in your home. If you buy too small, you won’t get the results you’re looking for.

This is why it’s a good idea to purchase more than one if you want to keep all the air in your home clean.

Here’s how to measure in order to determine what size air purifier you need (you’ll need a tape measure and possibly a calculator):

  • Measure L x W x H of the area you want to filter, such as your home gym (measure to the highest point of the ceiling, along with the longest and widest lengths, if the room isn’t built completely square).
  • Using a calculator multiply L x W x H to find the square footage of the room.

For instance, a room that’s 10 x 12 x 8 = 960 square feet. In this case, you’d have to round up to a purifier rated to cover 1000 or more square feet.

Air filter replacement cost:

This one is simple. Go with the unit that offers cheaper filter changes. Regardless if the model with cheaper filters costs $100 more upfront.

Filter upkeep is the real expense when it comes to maintaining an air purifier, not the upfront cost. Considering filters need to be changed 4 times per year, and those filters range from $20 – $50 on average, it should be obvious how quickly things can start adding up.

Conclusion

Cleaning the air inside your home will promote greater health, improve your home workouts, and prevent diseases of lung and other cancers. Considering that most of us spend, on average, around 90% of our lives indoors now, a quality air purifier doesn’t just make sense, it really is essential to a long and healthy existence.

Think the air inside your home is clean? If you want proof one way or the other, sign-up for a FREE Home Air Quality Assessment today. Sign-Up Here

Weber Grilling Tips: Smoking Basics

Hungry for great smoked flavor? Our guides below will get your fire started whether you’re using a charcoal grill, a gas barbecue, or a traditional smoker. We’ve got tips for beginners and a comprehensive Smoking Woods Chart to match the right woods with specific foods. Check out our list of recipes to get you started.

GETTING STARTED

Woods: Start by soaking wood chunks in water for at least one hour; chips (including wine barrel chips) and aromatic twigs (grape vines or fruit wood twigs) need only 30 minutes of soaking. Shake all excess water off woods before adding them to your fire or smoker box. (See our chart below for available wood types.) You can find smoking woods in hardware stores and home centers-or if you’re lucky, in your own backyard! Wine barrel chips are available in specialty food stores and gift shops, and some hardware stores.

Water: Water adds moisture to the smoking process so meats come out flavorful and tender. If you’re using a traditional smoker with a water pan, try adding barbecue sauce, marinades, wine, beer, fruit juices, or herbs and spices to the water pan for additional flavor. Be sure to keep the water pan full. For large roasts and turkeys, you may have to add water to the pan a couple of times throughout grilling. Check the water pan when you add charcoal-a watering can makes replenishing easy. (Note: When smoking cheese, add ice to the water pan so the cheese doesn’t melt above it.) You can use a water pan with charcoal and gas grills, too.

Food: Place food in the center of the cooking grate above the water pan (if you are using one). Remember that smoke and heat escape every time you peek into the grill, so add 15 minutes to cooking time for each peek (more if you are smoking in cold weather). Boneless meats, such as beef brisket and pork shoulder, will shrink considerably during smoke-cooking, unless they have a heavy layering of fat. Simply cut off the fat before serving. (Note: Consider cooking your menu up to two days before serving. The smoke flavor becomes richer after a day or two in the refrigerator. That’s why smoked foods make great leftovers.) All Weber recipes are based on 70-degree weather with little or no wind at average altitudes, so add more cooking time for wind, cold, and high altitudes.

Preparing your Charcoal Grill, Gas Barbecue, or Traditional Smoker: Virtually all Weber Gas Barbecues can be equipped with or are sold with a smoker attachment (exceptions: Spirit Series and Genesis Junior). The smoker attachment makes it easy to turn your barbecue grill into a hot smoker. You can also improvise with a foil pan. Before preheating your grill, simply fill the water pan on the smoker attachment with hot tap water. Place presoaked wood chunks or chips/twigs in the other compartment, or in a foil pan directly on the Flavorizer Bars over the lit burner. (Use a separate pan for water if you are using a foil pan for the wood pieces.) Begin cooking after preheating and when grill is fully smoking.

Smoker: Always position smoker on a level, heatproof surface away from buildings and out of traffic patterns. It’s best to find a place away from the house, since smoke aromas can linger for hours. Weber’s Smokey Mountain Cooker Smoker has three grates-one for charcoal and two for food-and a water pan. To prepare the smoker, heap charcoal in the center of the charcoal grate, ignite the coals, and when coals have a light coating of grey ash, spread them evenly across the inside of the charcoal chamber. Check recipe for number of charcoal layers needed. If you are using the water pan, place it on the lower bracket of the center ring and fill it with hot tap water. Add seasonings to water, if desired.

Place soaked woods on the coals through the door on the front of the smoker. Keep all vents partially closed for smoke-cooking. Place food on the top and/or middle cooking grate, depending on recipe and food quantity. Arrange food in a single layer on each grate, leaving space for smoke to circulate around each piece. Add 12 to 14 briquets and as many wood chunks as needed to fire, and replenish water and seasonings.

WEBER’S CHEF’S TIPS FOR BEGINNERS

  • Use a meat thermometer to make sure smoke-cooked foods are done but not overcooked. Smoke-cooked foods look different than other grilled or oven-prepared foods. They may be pink or red when completely cooked (apple wood especially will make chicken look red, for example).
  • Use tongs and barbecue mitts to add charcoal, turn meats, refill the water pan, or adjust vents.
  • Do not use charcoal infused with starter fluid-it can add an unpleasant taste to your smoked foods.
  • Experiment with different woods and meats until you find the right combination for your tastes.
  • Start with a small amount of wood to see how you like the flavor, then add more for more intense smoky taste. (Just don’t overdo it; too much wood smoke over long periods can make food taste bitter.)
  • Try combining woods as you get more experienced for unique and flavorful results.
  • Keep a smoker’s notebook while experimenting. Jot down ingredients, wood amounts and combinations, and results so you can repeat successes. (Unless, of course, you want to keep your best recipes a secret!)
Wood Type Characteristics Good Food Matches
Hickory Pungent, smoky, bacon-like flavor. Pork, chicken, beef, wild game, cheeses.
Pecan Rich and more subtle than hickory, but similar in taste. Burns cool, so ideal for very low heat smoking. Pork, chicken, lamb, fish, cheeses.
Mesquite Sweeter, more delicate flavor than hickory. Tends to burn hot, so use carefully. Most meats, especially beef. Most vegetables.
Alder Delicate flavor that enhances lighter meats. Salmon, swordfish, sturgeon, other fish. Also good with chicken and pork.
Oak Forthright but pleasant flavor. Blends well with a variety of textures and flavors. Beef (particularly brisket), poultry, pork.
Maple Mildly smoky, somewhat sweet flavor. Try mixing maple with corncobs for ham or bacon. Poultry, vegetables, ham.
Cherry Slightly sweet, fruity smoke flavor. Poultry, game birds, pork.
Apple Slightly sweet but denser, fruity smoke flavor. Beef, poultry, game birds, pork (particularly ham).
Peach or Pear Slightly sweet, woodsy flavor. Poultry, game birds, pork.
Grape vines Aromatic, similar to fruit woods. Turkey, chicken, beef.
Wine barrel chips Wine and oak flavors. A flavorful novelty that smells wonderful, too. Beef, turkey, chicken, cheeses.
Seaweed Tangy and smoky flavors. (Wash and dry in sun before use.) Lobster, crab, shrimp, mussels, clams.
Herbs & spices (bay leaves, rosemary, garlic, mint, orange or lemon peels, whole nutmeg, cinnamon sticks, and others) Vary from spicy (bay leaves or garlic) to sweet (other seasonings), delicate to mild. Generally, herbs and spices with higher oil content will provide stronger flavoring. Soak branches and stems in water before adding to fire. They burn quickly, so you may need to replenish often. Vegetables, cheeses, and a variety of small pieces of meat (lighter and thin-cut meats, fish steaks and fillets, and kabobs).

Ready for Outdoor Fun? Get a Weber Grill! 

Quick Tips For Weber Grill Maintenance and Cleaning

We know you made an investment in your Weber grill. Check out these quick tips and let us show you how easy it is to clean, protect and maintain your prized purchase. If you follow these simple steps, it will last you for years, even decades to come! That’s why we say Weber For Life!

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Recipe of the Week: Swordfish and Tomato Kabobs

INGREDIENTS

MARINADE

  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
  • Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 small shallot, minced
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 swordfish steaks, each about 8 ounces and 1 inch thick, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 cups (about 24) grape tomatoes

INSTRUCTIONS

  • If using bamboo skewers, soak in water for at least 30 minutes.
  • Prepare the grill for direct cooking over medium heat (350° to 450°F).
  • In a medium bowl combine the marinade ingredients. Put the swordfish steaks in the bowl, cover, and marinate at room temperature for 15 to 30 minutes while the grill preheats.
  • Thread the swordfish and tomatoes alternately on the skewers. Discard any remaining marinade.
  • Brush the cooking grates clean. Grill the kabobs over direct medium heat, with the lid closed as much as possible, until the swordfish is opaque in the center but still juicy, 8 to 10 minutes, turning several times. Remove from the grill and serve right away.

Ready for Outdoor Fun? Get a Weber Grill! 

Grill Review: Weber Genesis S-330

Simply put the Weber Genesis line of grills are the best you can buy in this price range and beyond. What you get with the S-330 is a three burner grill, a 12,000 BTU side burner, and a 10,000 BTU internally mounted sear burner. Other models in this series come without the side burner or the sear burner.You decide which configuration works for you and buy only what you need.

Description

  • Three 12,666 BTU stainless steel tubular burners
  • 507 square inches of primary grilling space for a total cooking area of 637 square inches
  • 38,000 BTU maximum output from the main burners
  • 12,000 BTU standard side burner under a flush mounted cover
  • 10,000 BTU internal booster sear burner
  • Push button electric (AA-battery) ignition
  • Stainless steel rod cooking grates
  • Constructed of cast aluminum and stainless steel (400 series stainless)
  • Dual layer hood with double vaporization system for heat retention
  • Sold as either propane or natural gas – not convertible

To really understand the Genesis grill you need to look inside the firebox. The three burners put out only 38,000 BTUs under 507 square inches of cooking space or about 75 BTUs per square inch. While this is low when compared to other gas grills, the efficient design holds in heat. The problem is that with just the main burners, it takes longer to preheat than more powerful grills. The sear burner is going to give you fantastic searing heat, but only on the left side of the grill. Plan on letting this grill heat up for a good 20 minutes before it hits high temperatures.

What really makes the Weber Genesis S-330 stand out is its quality. The attention to detail that takes 3 years to change the burner design can be seen in every part of this grill. This means that everything on this grill works, and since there is a 10-year warranty on virtually everything in this grill, you can rely on it to last for at least a decade and I would believe longer.

This model includes a 12,000 BTU side burner under a flush mounted cover on the right side table and a 10,000 BTU sear burner. This sear burner is simply an additional, standard burner built inside the firebox between the center and left burners. This boosts the heat output on this side of the grill giving you an intense heat for searing.

What this model has are stainless steel body panels and lid, stainless steel rod cooking grates, and stainless steel vaporization bars. Obviously, the stainless steel version isn’t going to cook any better than its more colorful cousin, and in my experience, this one won’t last any longer than that one.

Ready for Outdoor Fun? Get a Weber Grill! 

How Air Pollution Affects our Brains

For most people, it’s easy to see how air pollution can have a negative impact on respiratory health. After all, it is inhaled into the lungs and through the passageways of the respiratory system; also, anyone who’s ever been in the midst of a lot of smoke – like a bonfire – knows how it can make you cough and splutter. Indeed, the impact that air pollution has on the lungs and on breathing is apparent, but a couple of new studies show a tentative link between pollution and reduced brain performance that is sure to surprise you.

New Information about Pollution and the Human Brain

Hundreds of studies have delved into the effects of air pollution and the respiratory system; far fewer have taken closer looks at the relationship between pollution and the brain. That is beginning to change, though, as several highly respected research groups are examining the ways that air pollution may affect the human brain. Two of the most recent studies – one by the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health, and the other by a joint effort between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Harvard University – present some truly eye-opening information.

The Columbia Study

In the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health study, which was authored by epidemiologist and director Frederica Perera, New York City five-year-olds were the subject of the research in question. The study found that five-year-olds who had been exposed to higher than usual levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAH, while still in utero had IQ levels four points lower than those who weren’t exposed to such elevated levels of PAH. The study was conducted by having expectant mothers wear air monitors during their pregnancies, and IQ tests were administered to the children around age five.

The Harvard/UNC-Chapel Hill Study

If news that PAH may play a role in lowered IQs in children isn’t revelatory enough, the joint study by Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill may be. This 2008 study took a look at a group of people aged twenty to fifty years and found connections between elevated levels of ozone and reduced attention spans, slower reaction times and compromised short term memories. With this study, it is apparent that air pollution’s effects on the brain strike people of all ages and at all levels of development.

What the Studies Mean

Based on these two recent studies – and on several others that are constantly being conducted – it is plain to see that a link of some sort does exist between elevated levels of air pollution and impaired brain function. The Columbia study, in particular, should concern parents-to-be who want to give their children the best start on life possible. Escaping to the country from the smog-filled city, though, really isn’t good enough. Indoor air quality is a major concern, and since most of us spend the majority of our time inside our homes it’s safe to say that it plays a major role in the pollutants that we breathe.

What You Can Do

On a broad scale, it’s apparent that much more needs to be done about levels of exhaust and traffic-related pollution. However, it’s possible to take a proactive approach by making a few key changes in your own life.

 

Staying indoors on especially smoggy days is one great tip. Keeping an eye on Air Quality Levels that are published by local watch groups is another smart way to stay on top of things. However, keeping the indoor air quality of your home as high as possible is imperative – and air cleaners can help.

HEPA Air Purifiers For Mitigating The Effects Of Air Pollution

HEPA air purifiers remove up to 99.97% of airborne particulates from the air in your home; they help with sinus, allergy, and asthma relief and can help protect your respiratory system from harm. Since these recent studies suggest a link between lowered brain functioning and air pollution, it’s possible that using a HEPA based air purifier can lessen the chances of incurring such damages yourself.

 

If you’re interested in using topnotch HEPA air purifiers in your home, you can rely on the experienced and exceptional services of Renaud Air. In turn, you can reduce the chances of exposing yourself and your loved ones to harmful airborne particulates and air pollution that might compromise the health of your brain and your body.

Protect Your Home from  Indoor Air Pollution – We conduct FREE Air Quality Test!

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Recipe of the Week: Grilled Chicken

Serves 4

Prep Time: 15 Minutes
Grill time: 30 Minutes

INGREDIENTS

Alabama White BBQ Sauce
  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/3 cup cider vine
  • ½ of a lemon juiced
  • 1 tbsp. garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp. horseradish
  • 1 tsp. pepper,
  • 1 tsp. dijon mustard
  • salt to taste
  • ½ tsp. cayenne pepper

DIRECTIONS

Step 1
Preheat your grill to 375°F, prepare to sear over direct heat, and finish your chicken using indirect heat.
Step 2
Rub the chicken on all sides with the Montreal Chicken Rub. Place the chicken, skin side down (if you have skin on) over direct heat. Sear for 5 minutes, or until the chicken releases from the cooking grids without sticking. Flip the chicken and place it over the unlit burners, but still close to the heat. Grill for another 20 to 25 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer says 165°F (75°C).
Step 3
While the chicken is cooking, prepare the Alabama Sauce. In a small bowl or a measuring cup, mix the mayonnaise, cider vinegar, lemon, garlic powder, horseradish, pepper, dijon, cayenne pepper. Whisk it well and salt to taste.
Step 4
When the chicken is ready, serve it with your favorite veggies like carrots or something seasonal. Top with loads of sauce. Try it on potatoes too!

It’s the right time to get your own BBQ Grill!. Buy Now at Renaud Air!

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