How to Grill Salmon on a Cedar Plank

Cedar plank grilling is an easy way to infuse salmon with a lush, smoky, aromatic flavor. Follow these 4 simple steps to get this grilling technique just right.

If you have never used wooden grilling planks, don’t worry — we’ll show you how in four easy steps. To get started, pick a plank-grilled salmon recipe you want to try.  Her something you can try,  simple but delicious Lime Barbecue Salmon Sandwiches.

Step 1: Choose a grilling plank

Cedar lends the most intense, aromatic flavor to salmon, but other woods are excellent for plank-grilling, too. We highly recommend the Weber Firespice Cedar Plank for that excellent smoke and flavor. 

Step 2: Prepare the plank

Plank-grilling gives salmon the flavor imparted by a smoker with the convenience of a grill. Be sure to prepare your wood properly to increase moisture for cooking and prevent burning.

Take these steps to prepare your wooden grilling plank:

  • Rinse the plank with water to remove any dust.
  • Fill a sink or other large container with water.
  • Submerge the plank in the water, placing a weight on top of it. Soak the plank for 1 to 4 hours.
  • Enhance the plank’s flavor by adding 1 tablespoon salt to the water. If desired, you may also stir in 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar, white wine vinegar, citrus or berry juice, or flavored liqueur to add more flavor.

Step 3: Prepare the salmon

Leave the salmon filet whole, cut it into serving-size portions, or use individual salmon steaks. You can add a dry rub, marinade, or herb mixture to flavor the salmon. Apply rubs to the salmon up to 24 hours in advance. Add marinades or herb mixtures to the salmon 2 hours or less before cooking.

Step 3.5: Prepare the grill for direct grilling

For a charcoal grill:

  • Light coals using lighter fluid, an electric starter, or a chimney starter. (If using lighter fluid, wait 1 minute before igniting the fire.) Let the fire burn until the coals are covered with a light coating of gray ash.
  • Arrange coals evenly across the bottom of the grill, covering an area 3 inches larger on all sides than the plank.

For a gas grill:

  • To light a gas grill, open the lid. Turn the gas valve to “on” and ignite the grill as directed by the manufacturer. Turn the burners on high. Close the lid and preheat the grill for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Reduce heat to medium.

Step 4: It’s Grill Time! 

  • Place the plank on the grill rack and allow it to preheat for about 5 minutes, or until it begins to crackle and smoke.
  • Lay the salmon onto the plank, cover the grill, and allow the salmon to cook for 12 to 20 minutes, depending on its thickness.
  • To test for doneness, insert a fork into the thickest part of the salmon. If it flakes easily, it’s finished cooking.

Weber Grilling Tips: Smoking Basics

Hungry for great smoked flavor? Our guides below will get your fire started whether you’re using a charcoal grill, a gas barbecue, or a traditional smoker. We’ve got tips for beginners and a comprehensive Smoking Woods Chart to match the right woods with specific foods. Check out our list of recipes to get you started.

GETTING STARTED

Woods: Start by soaking wood chunks in water for at least one hour; chips (including wine barrel chips) and aromatic twigs (grape vines or fruit wood twigs) need only 30 minutes of soaking. Shake all excess water off woods before adding them to your fire or smoker box. (See our chart below for available wood types.) You can find smoking woods in hardware stores and home centers-or if you’re lucky, in your own backyard! Wine barrel chips are available in specialty food stores and gift shops, and some hardware stores.

Water: Water adds moisture to the smoking process so meats come out flavorful and tender. If you’re using a traditional smoker with a water pan, try adding barbecue sauce, marinades, wine, beer, fruit juices, or herbs and spices to the water pan for additional flavor. Be sure to keep the water pan full. For large roasts and turkeys, you may have to add water to the pan a couple of times throughout grilling. Check the water pan when you add charcoal-a watering can makes replenishing easy. (Note: When smoking cheese, add ice to the water pan so the cheese doesn’t melt above it.) You can use a water pan with charcoal and gas grills, too.

Food: Place food in the center of the cooking grate above the water pan (if you are using one). Remember that smoke and heat escape every time you peek into the grill, so add 15 minutes to cooking time for each peek (more if you are smoking in cold weather). Boneless meats, such as beef brisket and pork shoulder, will shrink considerably during smoke-cooking, unless they have a heavy layering of fat. Simply cut off the fat before serving. (Note: Consider cooking your menu up to two days before serving. The smoke flavor becomes richer after a day or two in the refrigerator. That’s why smoked foods make great leftovers.) All Weber recipes are based on 70-degree weather with little or no wind at average altitudes, so add more cooking time for wind, cold, and high altitudes.

Preparing your Charcoal Grill, Gas Barbecue, or Traditional Smoker: Virtually all Weber Gas Barbecues can be equipped with or are sold with a smoker attachment (exceptions: Spirit Series and Genesis Junior). The smoker attachment makes it easy to turn your barbecue grill into a hot smoker. You can also improvise with a foil pan. Before preheating your grill, simply fill the water pan on the smoker attachment with hot tap water. Place presoaked wood chunks or chips/twigs in the other compartment, or in a foil pan directly on the Flavorizer Bars over the lit burner. (Use a separate pan for water if you are using a foil pan for the wood pieces.) Begin cooking after preheating and when grill is fully smoking.

Smoker: Always position smoker on a level, heatproof surface away from buildings and out of traffic patterns. It’s best to find a place away from the house, since smoke aromas can linger for hours. Weber’s Smokey Mountain Cooker Smoker has three grates-one for charcoal and two for food-and a water pan. To prepare the smoker, heap charcoal in the center of the charcoal grate, ignite the coals, and when coals have a light coating of grey ash, spread them evenly across the inside of the charcoal chamber. Check recipe for number of charcoal layers needed. If you are using the water pan, place it on the lower bracket of the center ring and fill it with hot tap water. Add seasonings to water, if desired.

Place soaked woods on the coals through the door on the front of the smoker. Keep all vents partially closed for smoke-cooking. Place food on the top and/or middle cooking grate, depending on recipe and food quantity. Arrange food in a single layer on each grate, leaving space for smoke to circulate around each piece. Add 12 to 14 briquets and as many wood chunks as needed to fire, and replenish water and seasonings.

WEBER’S CHEF’S TIPS FOR BEGINNERS

  • Use a meat thermometer to make sure smoke-cooked foods are done but not overcooked. Smoke-cooked foods look different than other grilled or oven-prepared foods. They may be pink or red when completely cooked (apple wood especially will make chicken look red, for example).
  • Use tongs and barbecue mitts to add charcoal, turn meats, refill the water pan, or adjust vents.
  • Do not use charcoal infused with starter fluid-it can add an unpleasant taste to your smoked foods.
  • Experiment with different woods and meats until you find the right combination for your tastes.
  • Start with a small amount of wood to see how you like the flavor, then add more for more intense smoky taste. (Just don’t overdo it; too much wood smoke over long periods can make food taste bitter.)
  • Try combining woods as you get more experienced for unique and flavorful results.
  • Keep a smoker’s notebook while experimenting. Jot down ingredients, wood amounts and combinations, and results so you can repeat successes. (Unless, of course, you want to keep your best recipes a secret!)
Wood Type Characteristics Good Food Matches
Hickory Pungent, smoky, bacon-like flavor. Pork, chicken, beef, wild game, cheeses.
Pecan Rich and more subtle than hickory, but similar in taste. Burns cool, so ideal for very low heat smoking. Pork, chicken, lamb, fish, cheeses.
Mesquite Sweeter, more delicate flavor than hickory. Tends to burn hot, so use carefully. Most meats, especially beef. Most vegetables.
Alder Delicate flavor that enhances lighter meats. Salmon, swordfish, sturgeon, other fish. Also good with chicken and pork.
Oak Forthright but pleasant flavor. Blends well with a variety of textures and flavors. Beef (particularly brisket), poultry, pork.
Maple Mildly smoky, somewhat sweet flavor. Try mixing maple with corncobs for ham or bacon. Poultry, vegetables, ham.
Cherry Slightly sweet, fruity smoke flavor. Poultry, game birds, pork.
Apple Slightly sweet but denser, fruity smoke flavor. Beef, poultry, game birds, pork (particularly ham).
Peach or Pear Slightly sweet, woodsy flavor. Poultry, game birds, pork.
Grape vines Aromatic, similar to fruit woods. Turkey, chicken, beef.
Wine barrel chips Wine and oak flavors. A flavorful novelty that smells wonderful, too. Beef, turkey, chicken, cheeses.
Seaweed Tangy and smoky flavors. (Wash and dry in sun before use.) Lobster, crab, shrimp, mussels, clams.
Herbs & spices (bay leaves, rosemary, garlic, mint, orange or lemon peels, whole nutmeg, cinnamon sticks, and others) Vary from spicy (bay leaves or garlic) to sweet (other seasonings), delicate to mild. Generally, herbs and spices with higher oil content will provide stronger flavoring. Soak branches and stems in water before adding to fire. They burn quickly, so you may need to replenish often. Vegetables, cheeses, and a variety of small pieces of meat (lighter and thin-cut meats, fish steaks and fillets, and kabobs).

Ready for Outdoor Fun? Get a Weber Grill! 

Recipe of the Week: Swordfish and Tomato Kabobs

INGREDIENTS

MARINADE

  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves
  • Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 small shallot, minced
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 swordfish steaks, each about 8 ounces and 1 inch thick, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 cups (about 24) grape tomatoes

INSTRUCTIONS

  • If using bamboo skewers, soak in water for at least 30 minutes.
  • Prepare the grill for direct cooking over medium heat (350° to 450°F).
  • In a medium bowl combine the marinade ingredients. Put the swordfish steaks in the bowl, cover, and marinate at room temperature for 15 to 30 minutes while the grill preheats.
  • Thread the swordfish and tomatoes alternately on the skewers. Discard any remaining marinade.
  • Brush the cooking grates clean. Grill the kabobs over direct medium heat, with the lid closed as much as possible, until the swordfish is opaque in the center but still juicy, 8 to 10 minutes, turning several times. Remove from the grill and serve right away.

Ready for Outdoor Fun? Get a Weber Grill! 

Recipe of the Week: Grilled Chicken

Serves 4

Prep Time: 15 Minutes
Grill time: 30 Minutes

INGREDIENTS

Alabama White BBQ Sauce
  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/3 cup cider vine
  • ½ of a lemon juiced
  • 1 tbsp. garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp. horseradish
  • 1 tsp. pepper,
  • 1 tsp. dijon mustard
  • salt to taste
  • ½ tsp. cayenne pepper

DIRECTIONS

Step 1
Preheat your grill to 375°F, prepare to sear over direct heat, and finish your chicken using indirect heat.
Step 2
Rub the chicken on all sides with the Montreal Chicken Rub. Place the chicken, skin side down (if you have skin on) over direct heat. Sear for 5 minutes, or until the chicken releases from the cooking grids without sticking. Flip the chicken and place it over the unlit burners, but still close to the heat. Grill for another 20 to 25 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer says 165°F (75°C).
Step 3
While the chicken is cooking, prepare the Alabama Sauce. In a small bowl or a measuring cup, mix the mayonnaise, cider vinegar, lemon, garlic powder, horseradish, pepper, dijon, cayenne pepper. Whisk it well and salt to taste.
Step 4
When the chicken is ready, serve it with your favorite veggies like carrots or something seasonal. Top with loads of sauce. Try it on potatoes too!

It’s the right time to get your own BBQ Grill!. Buy Now at Renaud Air!

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How to Cook the Perfect Steak with Infrared Heat

Grilling the perfect steak on an Infrared BBQ or grill takes less time and less energy but unbelievable results! Napoleon’s infrared burners produce searing heat for juicier, tastier steaks, hamburgers and other meats.

 

 

It’s the right time to get your own BBQ Grill!. Buy Now at Renaud Air!

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Recipe of the Week: Holiday Stuffing

Holiday Stuffing with Grill-Roasted Chestnuts and Sausage is a savory side that pairs well with pretty much anything, especially poultry. It’s great for feeding a crowd, and everyone can have some of the crispy top if you baked it in a pan instead of stuffing a bird with it.

Serves 8

Prep Time: 30 Minutes

Grill time: 90 Minutes

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb. of fresh chestnuts
  • 1 loaf of fresh sourdough bread
  • ½ cup of garlic butter
  • 2 tsp. fresh sage
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • salt to taste
  • 3 italian-style sausages
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 stalks of celery, chopped
  • ½ cup of dry white wine
  • 2/3 cup of chicken stock
  • 1 tbsp. poultry seasoning
  • salt to taste 

DIRECTIONS

Step 1

Before lighting the grill, line the warming rack of your grill with a sheet or two of tinfoil. Preheat your grill to 400°F, using only two burners.

Step 2

Using a sharp knife, carefully cut an ‘x’ into the top or side of each fresh chestnut.

Step 3

Place all of the chestnuts on the warming rack of the grill and roast them until the cuts have split open and the interior nut is tender, 40 minutes or so. Once done, remove the nuts to cool until you can handle them safely.

Step 4

While the chestnuts are roasting, slice the bread into bite sized chunks, season with garlic butter, sage, and then salt and pepper to taste. Place onto a baking sheet and using indirect grilling, bake the bread until crispy.

Step 5

Turn the grill down, and allow it to cool to 350°F.

Step 6

While the chestnuts are roasting over your grill’s open fire, grill the sausages over direct heat until sear marks form and they get a little smoky.

Step 7

Crack the shells off of the nuts, and chop them into bite-sized pieces.

Step 8

Remove the casings and finish the sausages in a frying pan. Add the onion and celery and continue to cook over medium heat until the celery and onion are tender. Deglaze the pan with the white wine, allowing it to reduce by half.

Step 9

Toss the sausage and veggies, toasted bread, and chopped chestnuts together in a large bowl. Pour over the chicken stock and mix well. Pour the stuffing mixture into a greased baking dish, cover with foil and bake over indirect heat for about 30 minutes. Uncover and bake until the top is crispy.

Step 10

Serve this as a great side for any family meal, topped with fresh parsley as a garnish.

A Newbie’s Guide to BBQ Grills

So, you’ve taken the plunge and bought yourself a brand new grill.

Wait? Are you new to grilling?

Don’t know how to light a barbecue?

Well, have no fear. It’s not as complicated as it looks. If you’re thinking about buying a barbecue, we’ll break down the pros and cons of charcoal and gas grills. For those just finding their way around a grill, we’ll follow up with some of the first steps to throwing some food on the barbie. And for those who are already all fired up, we’ve got some recipes ready to go, as well as a slew of barbecue tips and tricks. And even if you’re a city slicker like Kathy, and outdoor grilling isn’t an option, try indoor grilling!

Which Barbeque to Use? Charcoal or Gas?

Despite what some fervent grillers say, one isn’t necessarily superior to the other. There are pros and cons to both grilling methods, so it’s really your call! Here’s a rundown of some of the pros and cons:

Charcoal Barbeque Grills

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Pros:

  • inexpensive grills are easy to find, and upscale models are available too (+)
  • Gets very hot quickly
  • Smoky flavor every time you grill
  • You get to play with real fire

Cons:

  • Needs to be manually lit and preheated for a minimum of 20 minutes or longer
  • Cleaning is more complicated due to ashes
  • Tough to keep a constant temperature

Gas Barbeque Grills

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Pros:

  • Easy to clean
  • Has the option of smoky flavor or not, with use of wood chips in a smoker box
  • Convenient

Cons:

  • Typically pricier than charcoal, though inexpensive models are available
  • A more complicated grill means more parts to setup

Get Your Grill On! (How to Use your Barbecue)

If you’re using a charcoal grill, empty the ashes from your last grilling session.
Both types of grills need to be pre-heated before you start cooking. Gas grills turn on easily (make sure the lid is open while you’re lighting the grill!), but if you’re new to lighting one, here’s a video demonstration. To light your charcoal grill, you’ll need a chimney starter. Please don’t light your charcoal with lighter fluid! It seems like a quick fix, but it can make your food taste “chemical.” Let the gas grill heat up for at least 10 minutes, and your charcoal grill for at least 20.

After your grill is preheated, use a brass-wire brush to scrape the charred goo and gunk off of the grate. You’ll need to give it a good scrape at the beginning of grilling season. Then, during grilling season, a quick brush before and after grilling should do.

After you grill your last meal for the summer or fall, leave the grease on the grate to prevent rusting over the winter. (If you don’t have one of those brushes, you can use some aluminum foil to do the trick!)

Once your grill is clean, oil the grate by grabbing an oiled paper towel with some long tongs, and wiping it over the bars. You’ll need to use an oil with a high smoking temperature, like canola oil.
Now that your grill is hot and the grate is clean, your food won’t stick to it as much, and you’re likely to get those classic grill lines!

What to grill

Here’s a list of recipe ideas to get you started.

  • Grilled cheese
  • Vegetables
  • Vegetable kabobs
  • Corn on the cob
  • Grilled sweet onions wrapped in bacon
  • Grilled pizza
  • Pork chops and caramelized onions
  • Grilled Teriyaki Beef Kabobs (make sure you have your Teriyaki sauce ready)
  • Salmon
  • Baby Back Ribs!

Plus a couple of Barbecue Tips and Tricks

  1. To avoid losing juices during turning, always flip your meat or vegetables using tongs or a spatula, rather than a fork.
  2. Try to limit the flips. Ideally, you should flip each item once during the grilling process.
  3. Whatever you do, don’t press down on burgers or chicken (or anything) with a spatula while they’re grilling! This squeezes out the juices and once they’re gone … they’re gone! If you’re bored and need something to do with your hands, learn to juggle (but not too close to the grill, please!).
  4. For great smoky flavor, soak some wood chips (hickory, oak, or other hardwoods but not treated lumber!) in water for a while, then throw them onto your charcoal and cover the grill, or if you’re using gas, put them into your smoker box following the manufacturer’s instructions.
  5. To infuse grilled foods with herb essence, toss herbs directly onto the charcoal while you’re grilling. Or, if you’re using a gas grill, soak the herbs in water, and place them on the grate before putting your food on top of them.
  6. If you want to baste your meat or vegetables, save this step for last. That way the sugars in ,your marinade or sauce won’t have time to caramelize or burn.
  7. If this all sounds too complicated, or if it’s raining or cold outdoors, you can grill indoors with a contact grill or use a grill pan.

It’s the right time to get your own BBQ Grill!. Buy Now at Renaud Air!

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